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Aaaah, the virtual interview. In the past? An honor held for cross-country hires and early round interviews. Currently? The norm.

Job seekers are brushing up on their onscreen conversational skills and perfecting their Zoom smiles, but hiring managers should also prepare to utilize this potentially unfamiliar format. For employers, it can be difficult to recalibrate your in-person evaluation skills for a socially distant format, sans handshakes and body language.

Virtual Interview Tips for Attracting and Identifying Top Candidates

With increased efforts to keep workplaces safe and healthy, it doesn't look like in-person interviews will be returning anytime soon. Polish up your interrogat– erm, interview skills, and prepare to shift your thinking a bit to adjust to this increasingly common platform.

Your Appearance Matters Too

The focus is usually on candidates professional appearance and chosen background, but don't forget: you're trying to sell them on your company at the same time! Without the ability to walk around and see your workplace, there's an incentive to differentiate yourself from the handful of other white-walled interviews your favorite candidate may have lined up. Choose a location with decent lighting and don't be afraid to stray from a blank wall.

Test Your Tech

Make sure your platform is working properly and camera and video quality is decent. Even if you've used them recently, be sure all connections are solid as unexpected problems can arise without notice. Also, have the candidate's contact information handy in case of a delay or a break in your meeting.

Lighten the Mood

Many people find a video chat to be more awkward than an in-person meeting. Staring at a screen isn't always the easiest way to warm up to someone, so do you both a favor and try to get your interviewee to loosen up a bit. Whether it's asking about their weekend or talking about your own day a little bit, some small talk will get things on a more comfortable path.

Convey Your Company Culture

Without an in-office visit, a candidate has no way of knowing what it's like to work with you, or who they'll be working with. A great way to convey this via vide chat is to either have a member of your team jump on the call or arrange a separate one. You can also make a point to describe how a typical workday goes, what your team is like, or if you're in your office (socially-distanced, of course) and on a laptop, take them on a tour.

Pay Attention to Body Language

Limiting your view of a candidate to a screen can help highlight revealing mannerisms. If the candidate isn't maintaining eye contact or is shifting in their seat, they may be nervous. Good posture indicates self confidence and leaning into the camera means they are engaged in the conversation. Body language will inform your overall impression of a candidate, so be alert.

The virtual interview will likely be an important skill for your toolbox in the future. Make sure your company stays ahead of the game and masters the skills needed to identify and attract top candidates with these tips for a great virtual interview.

Posted: 10/28/2020 1:12:35 PM by Amanda Wahl | with 0 comments


43 out of 100 workers plan to look for a new job in the next 12 months, according to a recent study by global staffing firm Robert Half. Imagine what your company would look like after losing 43% of your staff, and join the ranks of employers who are "very concerned" about these findings.

why_employees_quitEmploying typical tactics like improving communication and bumping up employee recognition can help, but there are many other reasons a team member leaves for greener pastures. The reasons for professional departure range from psychological to monetary, but there are ways to retain some of your best hires without making massive changes to your company.

What make employees jump ship?

They want more money

Large debts – student debt, housing expenses, childcare expenses, car payments, and more – plague the budget of the average American, and higher salaries provide job satisfaction and peace of mind. The truth might hurt your company wallet: when it comes to retention strategies, better compensation is the clear frontrunner. The Robert Half study reports that 43% of workers leave a job for more money, with less than half of that number responding with the second highest reason:

... and more time off / better benefits

As one of the most overworked nations (with no mandated paid sick leave), it's no wonder that time off and decent benefits are heavily valued in the American workplace. Increasing vacation time, closing the office during the holidays, honoring summer Friday hours, or changing up your lunch policy are all small ways to boost morale and keep your people sticking around.

Work flexibility is becoming the norm.

More than three quarters of workers in a Crain's study say flexible schedules and remote work are the most effective non-monetary ways to retain talent. Allowing employees the freedom to work in a comfortable environment, avoiding a daily commute and working at their prime productivity throughout the day is an incredibly easy way to give your employees another reason to stay. It's not just good for your team, it's good for business - 85% of companies say productivity has increased due to greater flexibility.

There's no path for advancement

If you've hired any members of Generation Z, you might have noticed an uptick in expectations. A survey revealed that 75% believe they'll deserve a promotion after working in their position for only a year. Offering new job titles and setting a plan for career growth are potential solutions, but younger employees may just have different expectations that should be addressed directly.

Other generations feel similarly, seeking a need to feel "essential." Giving them ownership and control over their responsibilities along with a clear path for advancement results in a loyal and productive team.

They aren't learning

A third of employees who quit attribute it to lack of skill development. Workers want to contribute to companies who support their careers and professional development, so once they stop learning, you can count on an empty cubicle. Ambitious people have a growth mentality, so give them the opportunity to attend workshops or seminars and bring back some fresh ideas and enthusiasm for your industry. Retaining top talent means allowing the space for professional as well as personal growth.

They want a new boss

You've heard the saying: people don't leave companies, they leave managers. A boss with seemingly small bad habits can have a massive effect on the success of your business, so take a look in the mirror and make sure you're prioritizing team satisfaction.

We'll touch more on this topic in our next blog post, but until then, take these tips to heart and keep your top performers right where they belong – on your team!

Posted: 1/15/2020 11:12:52 AM by Amanda Wahl | with 0 comments


Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.
- Vince Lombardi

From a young age, most of us are quickly familiarized with the phrases "in a perfect world..." and "practice makes perfect." We spend so much time and energy becoming the perfect student, getting perfect scores. It would be difficult to argue that achieving perfection is the highest level of success, it seems.

plenty-of-fish

When we were all in school, hitting this target was more obvious – grades, class rankings, and evaluations all told us how close we were to being the "best." But years and years later, here we are, wondering how we measure up compared to others. As a job candidate, are we a "perfect fit"?

Well, there's good news, for candidates as well as hiring managers!

Job seekers – you can't be "perfect"!

Every position has slightly different requirements, and being excellent in school won't always help you here. Show off your skills and display your talent, but don't dismiss an opening just because you don't think it sounds like a perfect match. Apply for positions just outside of your exact skill set and you might be surprised  at what you find – employers are willing to train the right candidate or shape the position to fit your strengths.

Hiring managers – there is no "perfect."

If you're holding out for the "ideal" candidate, it's time to stop. Last year was the first in almost two decades where the number of U.S. jobs available was equal to the number of job seekers. There's no shortage of open positions, so don't continue to tell yourself the next interviewee will be The One – the grass is not always greener. Instead, take a deep look at the habits, strengths, and personality of the candidate sitting in front of you and consider them for your company as well as for the specific position. Are they eager to learn? Diligent? Responsible, adaptable, and talented? They could be the perfect person for your team.

There's no telling what an adjustment to your thinking could do to your professional career or your business. If you're lucky enough to score an interview or meet a great candidate, you should count your lucky stars and stop holding out for something better – nay, perfect.

 

 

Posted: 3/21/2019 10:24:15 AM by Amanda Wahl | with 0 comments