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Get the Good Candidate You Interviewed to Show Up for the Job

Give your workplace a hard look and you'll see it – there's often someone who is less than a perfect fit. Maybe they don't communicate well, they're somewhat unprofessional, or simply put – they just aren't as efficient as you had hoped.

What does it take to find employees who will show up with the skills, savvy, and seriousness to make you satisfied with your decision to hire them? It doesn't take much, but we'll help get you started.

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Pay close attention to their Job Application Self.

In theory, everyone would present an accurate version of themselves throughout the hiring process, but besides lying on resumes (which ___% of the population has admitted to doing), people do much more. Have you ever described yourself with qualities you are hoping to have or wish you had already mastered? Candidates do the same thing by presenting a potential employer with their aspirational self instead of their true self. This unintentional phoniness leaves employers with only one option: pay close attention to what they DO instead of what they SAY.

Do they claim to be excellent communicators but have some confusing wording in their emails?
Do they flaunt organization skills but their portfolio filename ends with "final_FINALreal2.pdf"?
Are they pitching themselves as a people-person but have trouble connecting in the interview?

In all of these instances, there is an opportunity to cut through claims of perfection to get to the meat of a person. What they do is who they are, and you can't assume that good intentions will become long term qualities.

Give them a trial period.

There's only one way to truly know how a person will act in your workplace, and that's to pop them right in! Set up a trial employment period at the beginning of the hire, trying anything from 2 days to 1 month. And don't underestimate what three days in an office can tell you about a person's work ethic and general demeanor.

Ask their references informative questions.

"Did you enjoy working with them?" might give you a clue that the person will be a culture fit, but how much does it tell you about their professional abilities? References will provide glimpses into your potential hire's professional life, offering evidence of their work habits, strengths, and flaws. Asking them the right questions can address your future concerns before they even arise. Skip over the general questions and ask what motivates them, what their communication style is like, etc. We'll have more suggestions in an upcoming blog post!

Listen to your colleagues.

If anyone else at your organization met the candidate, what did they think? Different people can offer a new perspective on a prospective hire, especially from those they'd be working alongside. See what others think, and be open to the possibility that a candidate might put on a different face for a future coworker than they would a future boss.

Be clear about the rules.

In many cases, an employee that appears to be somewhat lacking is just an employee who hasn't been told the rules. When you're on-boarding a new team member, have a team-wide meeting to refresh on company policies like vacation time, lunch breaks, and the like, or review the employee handbook with them. Then there's no question about your expectations..

Assuring the new hire that shows up on day 1 is the same person you interviewed can be a tough task, but hopefully these tips get you one step closer to keeping your team strong!

 

Posted: 8/27/2019 2:06:05 PM by Amanda Wahl | with 0 comments
Filed under: hiring manager tips, hiring tips, job candidate, new hire red flags